Saturday September 6, 2014: 23 birds of 16 species, 12 recaps.  New species:  Blackburnian Warbler.  Bird of the day was a tie between Red-eyed Vireo and Chestnut-sided Warbler, each with 3 new bands.  32 species detected onsite.

We were originally predicting a great morning with the passage of a cold front, but the weather moved more slowly than we hoped, and we spent the day anxiously watching the radar.  We cautiously opened the near nets at dawn, and then opened the rest about 2.5 hours into the morning.  We did get a few sprinkles now and then, but they were short-lived (usually a minute or two) and were very light.

For the first part of the day, it was birds by ones and twos again.  Then, at hour 5, we captured 15 new birds and 5 recaps.  Almost all were in two of the back aerial nets (#60 and #70), and they were of mixed species including Red-eyed Vireo, Black-capped Chickadee, and 7 species of warbler.

Blackburnian Warbler

Blackburnian Warbler

Brewster's Warbler.  This Blue-winged / Golden-winged hybrid looks almost like its Blue-winged ancestor, but had yellow wing bars which caused us to call it a Brewster's.

Brewster’s Warbler. This Blue-winged / Golden-winged hybrid looks almost like its Blue-winged ancestor, but had yellow wing bars which caused us to call it a Brewster’s.

The other big excitement was that Katie Little arrived to set up the MARS trailer.  She patiently waited for several hours for one of her target species, and she was rewarded with several.  We held our breath to see if the computers would work this season, and they did!  Banding birds is really all about the scientific knowledge you derive, so we are pleased that we are able to contribute to Dr. Morris’ ongoing research.